In this seminar we will examine scholarship and exemplary practices in persuasive communication. A key element of the seminar is that students will develop, practice, and learn to critique and improve their own public presentations. We will practice various elements of engaging the audience including the art of questioning, the use of visual tools, professional body language and the use of space, and structural strategies for effective presentations. Participants may elect to participate in video recording and analysis of their practice sessions. In all cases, students will have the opportunity to practice with one another in a supportive setting as they work to refine their personal speaking style and develop engaging discipline-based presentations.

This short, 3–week course is aimed at advanced doctoral students who wish to start developing their teaching portfolios in order to begin preparing for job applications, teaching reviews or teaching demonstrations and other professional situations in which having a teaching portfolio will be extremely valuable or even required.

This seminar for excellence in teaching is a custom-made introductory course in university teaching for CEU Legal Studies doctoral students. It is designed specifically to address the needs of preparation for Teaching Assistantship that is expected of the students in the beginning of next academic year (and future teaching duties). In putting this seminar together, we adapted selected core sessions of our longer 12-week foundational course “Teaching in Higher Education: Scholarship, Reflection and Innovation," and enhanced them through a consideration of legal education as an academic domain and a context for professional education.

This CTL seminar invites participants to investigate and discuss a range of inquiry-based teaching and learning strategies, including classical and modified problem-based learning approaches (including the written case-study), research-based and research-led learning, community-based learning, work-based learning, the flipped classroom and studio-method, integrative learning and any other approaches of interest.

This seminar will explore leading research and exemplary practices regarding how scholars can facilitate inquiry-based, student-centered discussions at the core of university teaching. What constitutes a good discussion in your academic field? How can you, as a discussion facilitator promote critical thinking, complex questioning, and deep understanding among your students? Doctoral students in the seminar will have an opportunity to develop discussion strategies appropriate to their academic disciplines, practice facilitating discussions, and receive critical feedback from members of the seminar.

This 4-week course is part of a set of seminars that focuses on learning-centered instructional design as the core of all university teaching. By designing for learning we mean that course design begins with understanding your students; deciding what you want them to learn; determining how you will measure their learning; and planning activities, assignments, and materials that support their learning. Although courses may vary in size, subject matter, or level, this systematic process will help you structure your course and syllabus to effectively meet desired instructional goals.

This seminar for the excellence in teaching addresses perhaps the single most important area of student skill development in social sciences and humanities: development of critical thinking and writing skills. This implies a complex teaching and learning process, connected to the development of discipline-based ways of thinking, reading, critiquing and arguing which underlies future development of research and independent learning. Together we will engage in analyzing various discipline-based conceptions of critical thinking, we will critically analyse ways in which critical thinking and writing is taught and we will construct sample students assignments.

“Foundations in Teaching in Higher Education: Scholarship, Reflection and Innovation” is a thorough preparatory course in university course design, higher education teaching genres and student assessment techniques. This course will form the basis of a new comprehensive professional development program for CEU doctoral students hosted by the Center for Teaching and Learning.

This short, 3–week course is aimed at advanced doctoral students who wish to start developing their teaching portfolios in order to begin preparing for job applications, teaching reviews or teaching demonstrations and other professional situations in which having a teaching portfolio will be extremely valuable or even required.

This short course is designed to help doctoral students take advantage of the new participatory learning culture and explore ways to use technology to foster interaction, collaboration, and ownership over learning. Strategies to be discussed and modeled address teaching and learning processes and also focus on the transformed learner and instructor roles in online environments such as Moodle.